What Causes Vertigo During Menopause?

Menopause can already be a stressful stage in the lives of women and female patients. They have to contend with a number of different health conditions that are usually adverse effects or symptoms of menopause. This can include hormonal imbalances and changes in the menstrual cycle. However, another health condition or symptom that people need

woman feeling dizzy

Menopause can already be a stressful stage in the lives of women and female patients. They have to contend with a number of different health conditions that are usually adverse effects or symptoms of menopause. This can include hormonal imbalances and changes in the menstrual cycle.

However, another health condition or symptom that people need to address during menopause include vertigo or general dizziness. But is dizziness really connected to menopause or is it something that is completely unrelated. In this article, we look at what can cause vertigo during menopause and some possible treatment options. Read on to find out more.

Vertigo, Menopause, and Dizziness: How are they Connected?

Dizziness during menopause is a condition that is considered normal and should not be a cause for concern nor is it a serious medical condition. However, it is best that dizziness that is unexplained be discussed with a healthcare provider as this can be a sign of some other underlying condition.

Female individuals are more prone to experiencing dizziness while under the menopausal stage most probably caused by the aging process and the changes in the hormonal levels. It must be noted that getting dizzy is not the disease itself but an indication of something happening inside the patient’s body.

Vertigo, Menopause, and Dizziness: What are the Possible Causes?

Experts are still uncertain as to what factors directly cause dizziness and vertigo during menopause. However, some of the theories point toward a number of possible variables that can contribute to these health conditions. Listed below are some of them:

1. Changes in the Hormones

The symptoms of menopause start to present themselves during perimenopause and the shift towards actual menopause. This phase is where irregular menstrual periods start to occur. Perimenopause can last from four (4) years to eight (8) years until the menstrual period has completely halted for around 12 months (one year) and menopause has been completed.

Menopause happens to women between the age of forty (40) and 58. The ovaries lower their production of the hormones known as progesterone and estrogen during perimenopause, hormones that are critical for the reproductive system and reproductive health of individuals. The said hormones can also contribute to the other organ activities within the human body such as pancreas, heart, and brain functions.

The changes and the sudden drops in the levels of fertility hormones can result in dizziness and vertigo by affecting the following biological processes or functions:

a.Inner ear

The brain can get an idea of how to balance the body through an organ within the inner ear referred to as otoconia. This otoconium is composed of crystals (referred to as otoliths).

One study showed the connection between the loss or reduction in estrogen and otoconia weakening. It showed how women are affected by BPPV or benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. This vertigo is a type of medical condition that presents itself with dizziness when any form of movement is conducted or completed.

b. Metabolism

The metabolic system of the body helps in having the food broken down into simple sugars also known as glucose and have it delivered to the cells which can then be utilized by the body as an energy source or as some sort of fuel.

To maintain this process, it is important that estrogen levels are maintained as well. Once the level of estrogen in the body is significantly reduced, then the cells in the body may not be able to get adequate amounts of glucose which can result in dizziness and fatigue.

c. Heart

Heart palpitations can also be caused by changes in the hormones during menopause leading to the heart to skip or pound a beat. This heartbeat that is irregular can trigger bouts of vertigo and dizziness.

c. The Brain

Estrogen can assist the brain in understanding the position of the body and the environment surrounding it. When the levels of estrogen drop, the brain can experience some form of disorientation, leading to a feeling of spinning or imbalance.

2. Aging

The process of aging can result in the systems of the body, particularly the brain, to become inefficient in terms of the work they are previously able to do. This reduced function can also be worsened by changes in the hormones and contribute to the feeling of being dizzy or vertigo.

3. Indirect Causes

Vertigo and dizziness can also be the result of other indirect causes or symptoms of menopause. Some of these changes to the hormones related to fertility that can contribute to dizziness or vertigo include the following:

a. Insomnia

Changes in the hormones that are linked with menopause can lead to sleep disruption which can lead to the person’s inability to stay asleep or fall asleep, leading to poor quality or inadequate sleep.

b. Hot Flashes

Women in the United States (US) (around 75%) report to experiencing hot flashes during menopause which can make the body feel hotter than it normally should, spreading to the upper body, neck, and face.

c. Migraines

A number of studies showed that Epigone Migraine Vertigo can happen more frequently in people who are experiencing menopause. This kind of migraine can result in dizziness and headaches.

d. Stress and Anxiety

Panic and worry can become elevated when menopause strikes particularly due to events that are stressful such as taking care of aging parents and the patients aging themselves. These feelings of anxiousness can lead to what is known as a panic attack and can lead to vertigo and dizziness in some patients.

Vertigo, Menopause and Dizziness: Lifestyle Changes Tips

Some of the lifestyle tips people can follow to combat vertigo caused by menopause are:

  • Hydration: It is important that people drink at least eight (8) glasses of water and try to avoid coffee, alcohol, and sodas.
  • Eat small meals frequently: Doing this can help people maintain stable levels of blood sugar
  • Follow a proper sleeping schedule: To have good quality sleep, it is crucial that patients maintain regular wake times and sleep times. Exercising regularly, eating healthy, and improved hydration can improve the quality of sleep.

Possible causes of dizziness and vertigo during menopause

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