Can You Still Get PMS After Menopause?

PMS is one thing that many ladies experience. This is known as some symptoms that women experience once it’s about a week to their period. Once the period starts the symptoms would improve. What’s the full meaning of PMS? Well, it’s a premenstrual syndrome that explains why it happens before menopause. It’s a combination of

PMS after menopause

PMS is one thing that many ladies experience. This is known as some symptoms that women experience once it’s about a week to their period. Once the period starts the symptoms would improve. What’s the full meaning of PMS? Well, it’s a premenstrual syndrome that explains why it happens before menopause. It’s a combination of both physical and emotional symptoms. The symptoms vary from person to person but all in all, they all easily point towards PMS. For today we will be tackling the concern of people with PMS after menopause? Should you be experiencing PMS after menopause? Well, we will answer this as we go on.

Menopause, as you may already know, is a period wherein there is the cessation of menstruation. You can’t claim to have reached menopause when you are still menstruating. Even if you are 50 years of age and you’re still menstruating you can’t claim to have reached menopause. Also, menopause is evident only when there is the cessation of menstruation for a year straight. This means that for a whole year you haven’t seen your period. Well, many things are associated with menopause. But we won’t be concentrating on that today. Instead, we will be taking a look at the possibility of having PMS after menopause.

What is PMS?

This is a combination of both emotional and physical symptoms that many women feel before their menstruation. For some, it would start about a week to the start of their period and for some, it would stay till they finish their period. But usually, once a woman starts her period the symptoms go down a bit.

The assumption is that most women out there have PMS. It could go from mild to severe. Of course, the common one is the mild one which can be seen in like 75% of women. And the severe one can be seen in about 20-30% of women.

Take note that PMS comes as a result of hormonal changes. The menstrual cycle is one cycle with so many changes in hormones. When there are surges of these hormones it affects the brain. And with this, there is an emotional imbalance as well as a physical imbalance.

For different women, the symptoms would differ. But here are some of the common symptoms that you would find among women.

  • Acne
  • Digestive problems
  • Weight gain
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Poor sleep
  • Migraine or headache
  • Increased appetite
  • Abdominal bloating
  • Clumsiness
  • Fluid retention
  • Breast swelling and tenderness
  • Tiredness
  • Food cravings
  • Sweats and hot flushes
  • Increased sensitivity to light and touch

Some of the changes in mood that women with PMS experience are:

  • Confusion
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Low-self esteem
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Mood swings
  • Paranoia
  • Angry outburst
  • Irritability

One thing that you must know is that different factors contribute to PMS. Some of the factors are:

  • Psychological state
  • Stress
  • Obesity or overweight
  • Poor health
  • Genetics and family history
  • Smoking
  • The social and cultural environment

Is there a diagnostic test that can help out with diagnosing PMS? The answer to that is no. Even if you are to check the hormonal levels it would be normal. Doctors would usually take a look at your medical history. And then ask some questions about the symptoms. This would give the doctor an idea that you have PMS.

PMS After Menopause

One question that people ask is, is it possible to have PMS after menopause? The answer to that is no. PMS is something that happens due to the activity of a person’s ovaries. When a woman is fertile, that is when she can have PMS. So when you reach menopause your period would stop. And with that, you can expect that you would have PMS.

Take note that there are symptoms also associated with menopause. And some of these symptoms are similar to the symptoms of a patient with PMS. So don’t mistake one for the other.

One way to tell it apart is that PMS symptoms would last for certain days in a month. Especially before and during your period. While for menopause, it would last throughout. So the duration is one good way to know if the symptoms are PMS related or menopause-related.

Dealing with PMS

There are different options when it comes to dealing with PMS. Let’s dive into it.

  • Lifestyle changes: This is one way you can deal with PMS. Lifestyle changes involve exercise, sleep, cutting down on caffeine intake, and alcohol. Make sure you exercise regularly. You can do it at least three times a week. That would help increase the endorphins being released in the body. Also, rest as much as you can. Quit smoking. Also, reduce your consumption of caffeine and alcohol.
  • Dietary changes: One good way to deal with PMS is to manage what you eat. When you manage what you eat well then you would be able to manage your weight. Eat more veggies and fruits. Reduce your consumption of high sugar and high-fat foods.
  • Medications: This is where the place of your doctor comes in. There are different medications out there that can help with reducing the symptoms that come with PMS. And your doctor would be in the best position to prescribe a medication for you given the symptoms you have. Once you get the medications, use them as prescribed. You can be sure that it would help reduce the symptoms. If the symptoms persist after a while then you might need to go see your doctor again. A change of medication might be all you need.
  • Complementary therapies: Many women try this out often. It could come in the form of herbal supplements or mental therapies. Some of these are very effective in terms of improving symptoms of PMS. Just make sure that before you opt for any of these, you let your doctor know. That way, you are well-guided as to whether or not to opt for this.

PMS symptoms can be very overwhelming for women. But the good thing is that it goes away with time. And yes, the answer to your question is no. You can’t have PMS after menopause. You would have symptoms similar to PMS, but it’s not PMS.

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