Motrin vs. Advil vs. Tylenol

Motrin vs. Advil vs. Tylenol. Which among these is the best painkiller?

Motrin vs. Advil vs. Tylenol

Motrin vs. Advil vs. Tylenol. Which among these is the best painkiller?

As painkillers, they, of course, make sure the pain you feel fades away and you can go on your daily life. The best part about these painkillers is that they don’t need a prescription. Those are the things qualities they have in common. But what makes them different, and does the difference matter?

Before we find out what they specialize, we first have to know how pain works.

How Does Pain Work?

Pain is often a feeling we have especially when our body suffers from a physical trauma. In most cases, pain is caused by an inflammation. When there is an inflammation, the skin is stretched and the nerves are further exposed. When the body suffers a physical trauma, the sensory nerves send the sensations up to the brain where our brain understands it as pain.

Do the Brains Have Pain Receptors?

The brain doesn’t have pain receptors which means the brain cannot feel any “pain”. However, you’re probably wondering about headaches and migraines which Motrin, Advil, and Tylenol are used to treat. The difference is that the pain you feel in your head is due to abnormal chemical activity in the brain. Headaches and migraines occur often during emotionally stressful situations. These situations cause a variety of electrochemicals and neurotransmitters to fire off in your brain which may cause the “pain”.

Other times, other forms of head pain may also be due to internal bleeding or a set-up for an aneurysm. However, don’t diagnose it just like that. Seek help from a doctor when your headaches and migraines intensify.

Now that you know how pain works, let’s look at the different painkillers.

Motrin vs. Advil vs. Tylenol: Which is the best to stop pain?

Advil

Advil is the most common painkiller used. It is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which helps reduce the inflammation. By reducing the inflammation, it then stops the pain. Advil is its more common name but its true chemical name is: Ibuprofen. However, what makes Advil potent in its market is the fact it does not have acetaminophen which is present in Tylenol. In large quantities, acetaminophen can cause damage to the liver.

Motrin

Similar to Advil, Motrin also contains Ibuprofen which is the active ingredient. However, what makes Motrin different from Advil is that people need to take it with a full stomach. Some people have said that Motrin is best taken when one has food or has milk in the stomach. Whereas, Advil does not appear to need this. However, some have said also that Motrin is similar to Advil and that the main difference lies more in price.

Tylenol

Tylenol’s main difference lies in the additional ingredient. Tylenol has acetaminophen which can cause liver damage if taken in large amounts. However, the difference also includes the other active ingredient: paracetamol which is also present in Biogesic. Tylenol is often used also to treat migraines and headaches. Paracetamol also can help in relieving fever but it only treats the symptoms, not the disease itself.

So, Which is Better? Motrin vs Advil vs Tylenol?

For many people, it depends on the price. Some people say that Motrin is more expensive than Advil. On the other hand, people say that Tylenol might be too strong for simple headaches and small migraines. However, once the migraines become chronic, Tylenol might be recommended. Tylenol also may work best when you need to get some sleep. The effects of paracetamol-based medicines work best when one is about to sleep.

However before taking any of these things, always perform an allergy test. Sometimes, some people are allergic to a certain set of medicines. So, always have a test. But for this battle, Advil definitely wins in terms of availability and the least amount of side effects.Motrin vs. Advil vs. Tylenol

Source:

Leuschen, M. P., Filipi, M., & Healey, K. (2004). A randomized open label study of pain medications (naproxen, acetaminophen and ibuprofen) for controlling side effects during initiation of IFN β-1a therapy and during its ongoing use for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 10(6), 636-642.

Leuschen, M. P., Filipi, M., & Healey, K. (2004). A randomized open label study of pain medications (naproxen, acetaminophen and ibuprofen) for controlling side effects during initiation of IFN β-1a therapy and during its ongoing use for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 10(6), 636-642.

Fendrick, A. M., & Greenberg, B. P. (2009). A review of the benefits and risks of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the management of mild-to-moderate osteoarthritis. Osteopathic medicine and primary care, 3(1), 1.

Lim, G. P., Yang, F., Chu, T., Chen, P., Beech, W., Teter, B., … & Cole, G. M. (2000). Ibuprofen suppresses plaque pathology and inflammation in a mouse model for Alzheimer’s disease. Journal of Neuroscience, 20(15), 5709-5714.

Cleuvers, M. (2004). Mixture toxicity of the anti-inflammatory drugs diclofenac, ibuprofen, naproxen, and acetylsalicylic acid. Ecotoxicology and environmental safety, 59(3), 309-315.

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